Darkness There But Something More

What had I just experienced? Was it a mere hallucination? An illusion or just a figment of my fertile imagination? – Page 133, Darkness There But Something More. . . An individual is groomed to be self-sufficient and confident from a very young age. But there are times, when the bridges of confidence rustle under the burden of the unknown and an individual is surrounded by the clouds of self-doubt.  The esoteric is a mysterious realm, that is ever researched on and always spoken about; but only those who have felt it closely can be one step closer to the truth of this omnipresent enigma.

Darkness There But Something More, is an anthology of thirty stories written by thirty different authors and co-edited by Lopamudra Banerjee and Dr Santosh Bakaya. It deals with the territory of the unknown and the unseen through thirty short stories. Being a collection of stories, I would of course have my favourites to choose from. Hence, I would list down my favourite stories.

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The White Man’s Bungalow by Dr Sunil Sharma

The undead often make old houses and garden their home. This in turn earns the place the commonly used epithet, haunted house. This story speaks about one such house engulfed in stories and rumours from every perspective possible. It is only when a Journalist enters the house in the pretext of researching it for a story, do the readers find out the ultimate truth.

Two things attracted me the most towards this story- the description of the ‘haunted house’ and the fact that a Journalist uncovers the truth. Being a trained journalist myself, I do wonder at times, if some story somewhere would give me an opportunity for an otherworldly encounter, as well. Sadly, I don’t see that happening too soon!

The Last Trick by Shabir Ahmed Mir

A magician wants to practice a newly configured trick. However, he faces one issue. Thus, he wakes up his next room neighbour in the hotel and rehearses for his latest show. Looks pretty normal right? It is only the story that you have to read to find out what went wrong and where.

The story begins with a beautiful quotation by Christopher Priest from The Prestige. Apart from the story itself, that quote won my heart. Also, this short story had been awarded the First Prize at the Ghost Story Contest hosted by Learning and Creativity E-zine.

The Peepal Tree by Ramendra Kumar

A group of young girls are celebrating a friend’s birthday party. Things go wrong when animosities between girls are expressed through dire consequences.

The Peepal Tree deals with an important social subject- bullying. No one can fathom when and how can pent-up anger within the victim, transform into such deadly vengeance. Supernatural or not supernatural, bullying is definitely a subject that one needs to pay attention to and seek professional help if need be. I would also mention that this story had earned a Special Mention in the Ghost Story Contest by the Learning and Creativity E-zine.

#newbook #bookstagramindia #bookstagram #bookishfeatures #bookdefotos New review coming up on www.subhadrikasen.com

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All Out and Over by Cathy Sydlo Wilkes

All Out and Over is a story which is narrated by a marmoset depicting the plight of many circus animals and their afterlife.

What I liked the most was that, not every ghost story needs to be scary with visions of blood dripping fanged vampires and crooked nosed witches. Some can be heart-warming as well. This is one such story, where trapped creatures narrate their story and cross over to their ultimate destination.

The Reunion by Sarmita Dey (Ghosh)  

A tale of love lost so suddenly; and yet patiently awaiting a chance to meet the lost love in some other realm, in some other life, is rarely written by an author.

Not all love stories end well. But the most important lesson of life is to let go. There are things beyond our control, and in those times, one should submit to His will.

But for a crisper editing, the book would have been devoid of flaws. Nevertheless, Darkness There But Something More is a read that I would recommend if you like to read about the esoteric. It is definitely the kind of light reads that you would want to carry with yourself to your vacations. It is available for online purchase through Flipkart and Amazon.

One Part Woman by Perumal Murugan

Set against the rural background of the South, One Part Woman by Perumal Murugan,  describes the societal stigma attached to couples who fail to produce a child after years of marriage. Having a child, in the Indian tradition is the primordial aim of marriage. From the Vedas and Upanishads to other religious scriptures, all stress on the significance of a child, for pleasing one’s ancestor and to take the lineage forward. But unfortunately, many are not easily blessed with this boon.

Society often attach ridiculous humiliations to these couples, especially to the woman, resulting into a strained husband wife relationship. Many a times, the man even considers settling for a second marriage due to the doomed infertility of the first. Also, one must not forget the numerous notes that leave one’s pockets in order to please a little less than the supposedly thirty three crore Gods and Goddesses of the Indian mythology. One Part Woman highlights how society , especially the gossip girls of the society treat a barren woman. They usually compete against one another trying to pull down the morale of a woman who has been unsuccessful in bearing a child. The continuous bullying, insults, tantrums and being the centre of attention in public gathering and social events, change the personalities of such women making them impatient, outspoken, restless and even rude at times.

#booktime #booklover #bookandtea #onepartwoman #bookishdreams #bookishfeatures #bookdefotos

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The storyline of One Part Woman follows the relationship of Kali and Ponna, a couple married for over twelve years. A couple deeply in love with each other. A couple unable to conceive for the last decade despite trying all measures. Nevertheless, they have stood by each other and fought against all odds, never doubting or leaving one another. But things take an impactful turn when news reaches them of a last possible way to conceive.

If you are to read the blurb for the book, you would be thoroughly excited to read between the pages as it implies of a relationship test the couple must go through to produce an heir. However, once you start reading the book, you would find about three-fourths of it consumed by the social stigma imposed on the couple and the little intricacies of their relationship which are narrated through flashback episodes. The most anticipated part of the tale begins and ends within the last few chapters, giving less space for the readers to ponder on it. In fact, for those who would want to read the book solely based on this reason are bound to feel somewhat disappointed as the most anticipated portion of the story comes and goes at lightning speed. Further, though many writers prefer open-ended conclusions to their stories, somehow the readers would have anticipated a concrete conclusion to One Part Woman. The million dollar question of whether the couple is blessed with a child or not, gets lost in the maze of incidents that take place towards the end of this novel.

Nevertheless, the portrayal of a social cause is well highlighted by the author. The peer pressure thrust upon a childless couple often pushes them to make severe decisions. Thus, it is food for thought for the society, as it reflects the repercussions of societal pressure on the physical and mental strength of two otherwise perfect human beings.

One Part Woman is available at your nearest bookstores. Further, you can also purchase it online through Flipkart, Amazon or Snapdeal.

Cantilevered Tales: A Review

A power -hungry politico; and a quest to save a home with several unique people and their adventures. This is the best way I could sum up Cantilevered Tales by Jayant Kripalani.

According to the Oxford Dictionary, a cantilever bridge is defined as a ‘bridge made of two cantilevers projecting from piers and joined by girders.’ Had I not come across the book and seen the beautiful cover, at a city bookstore, I would not have bothered myself about the Howrah Bridge and its make. For me, it has always remained and will remain as an ideal symbol for the City of Joy. It is the humongous and majestic structure which has been a silent witness to everything that Calcutta and Kolkata has been through, since its inception. Just like the ebb and flow of the Ganges which flows beneath it, it has seen the change of power and authority, liberalism slowly making its way in to the minds of the people, the natural destruction to the city and the beautiful celebrations of every festival. It is the epitome of romance for lovebirds who manage to steal a few intimate moments away from the eyes of the self -proclaimed sentinels of  society.

Just as the bridge is witness to numerous stories daily; similarly, the protagonist of Cantilevered Tales, Khokhon Lahiri, stands witness to numerous tales of people surrounding him- people whose intentions, motives, interests and love are joined by the ever charming cantilever bridge. The book consists of twenty-six chapters that are unique narrations on their own and are yet connected to each other through a broader storyline.

The characters written about in the Cantilevered Tales make sure that they are relatable to someone who has been a child of this city for long. The protagonist is surrounded by lovable, witty and strong characters; each having an exceptional upbringing or background story. As the story progresses their life, habits, relation with the narrator and personalities are unveiled to the readers.

The story has some interesting themes. Two such themes which really caught my attention are the importance of upbringing and the need to fight for one’s right. Upbringing is an important part of every person’s life. Being deprived of a proper upbringing can lead to various psychological issues in a human being which can later turn against the individual making him/her a social outcast. Often in such situations you do not understand whether to pity them or hate them. Further, the need to fight for one’s rights is very important. One should never leave the path of justice and truth. There are times when the future might look bleak and the road might seem to have come to a dead end; but that is when your faith on justice and truth needs to be strengthened even further to guide you through the darkest days. The characters also display a certain comic sense. This often reminds us that we are usually always surrounded by one or two such ‘specimens’. But, most of the time, they are the ones we turn to in times of need and they always stay by our side.

So, if you are in for some light reading this season, with comic moments, and an want to venture on to an unthinkable path to save what is yours; then grab your coffee/tea , get a comfy setting and dig deep into Cantilevered Tales. It is available in most bookstores near you and can be ordered online through Amazon. Happy Reading!

Before We Visit The Goddess

Before We Visit The Goddess by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni  spans through the lives of three generations depicting their personalities, actions, decisions and mistakes. The narrative shifts from the naive yet determined village girl Sabitri; to her daughter Bela who takes impulsive decisions blinded by the love of her life; to her daughter Tara, who after witnessing strained relationships between her parents sets out to discover the world on her own. Set across a timeline of around ten decades across continents and three generations, Divakaruni highlights how with changing time, every relationship changes in an individual’s life. Simple emotions and societal acceptance grows by accepting newer terms and making the society liberal in its own way.

Sabitri comes to Kolkata from a small village in order to pursue her education. She was funded by one of the wealthiest ladies of the town. However, she enters the scope of forbidden love for which she is vanquished and left all alone to settle down in a new life. Bela, on the other hand had bigger dreams. But in the process of achieving them, dreams became bigger than relationships to her. Thus, Bela reflects on the compromises that an individual makes in order to put their foot forward for an imagined utopian destiny. Tara is brought up in the United States, thus instilling in her an unwavering ability to carve out her own life; learning from her mistakes and moving forward with it.

Before We Visit The Goddess explore three very different relationships that exist between a mother and a daughter. While a mother dies awaiting the return of her daughter; another regrets decisions taken years ago and laments the strained relationship with her daughter.  The three leading ladies have an immense sense of loss of relationships in their lives. However, each one tries to cope up with it in their own way. Thus, Divakaruni tries to fit in the idea of changing relationships with time and a sense of loneliness through her beautifully worded novel, Before We Visit the Goddess.

Personally, I would like to add that though this is a good novel on its own; considering her past works like ‘The Palace of Illusions’ or even ‘One Amazing Thing’, this is not her best novel. The abrupt jumps between years and a shift between the first person narratives through each chapter at times confuse the reader. There are instances when, as a reader I would have liked to know a little more about a character but no further details are provided about him or her. Few lines now and then talk of hidden truths, but they are not expressed very clearly for the reader. Lastly, the novel ends on an open-ended note. As a reader, probably I would expect a definite end. Open ended sequences do work well for some novels, but however for this one I found it as a mismatch.

Nevertheless, I would recommend you all to read the book once as a stand-alone book and to not compare it with any of her previous literary works. Before We Visit The Goddess is available on Flipkart, Snapdeal, Amazon and at your nearest bookstores.

If you have not read it yet, grab your copy now!

Mosaic Vision : A Review

Nestled within the colourful pages of Mosaic Vision, lies an anthology of poems written by Poet, Editor, Writer and Blogger Vaijayantee Bhattacharya. Her maiden book, Mosaic Vision was launched at the Oxford Bookstore Kolkata on the 23rd July, 2017.

Having spent a significant time of her life in Kolkata and Delhi, she now resides in Bahrain with her husband and son. Her poems are inspired thus of not only philosophical thoughts but also of the culture and traditions of three very different destinations. One would also find reflections of the different shades of human moods through the poems. This only goes on to highlight the versatility of the subjects the poet is capable of penning down.

Talking for myself, all thirty -seven poems were a pleasure to read. Each of them are interspersed with beautiful photographs which not only aids the presentation of the book but also breaks the monotony of mere words. However three poems stood out very distinctly for me as I could relate to them a lot.

The Mahalaya Morning. . . .

Though preparations for the Durga Puja begins months in advance, Mahalaya signifies that the festival is knocking on your doorstep. The sound of Dhakis, the pandals on the verge of completion, the last-minute bargains for new clothes and the smell of incense and shiuli flowers fill the air. Having been deprived of this scene for the past two years, The Mahalaya Morning touched a personal chord in my heart.

Yah Devi Sarvabhuteshu

Filled the morning air

With nostalgia

If You Saw Me in Heaven. . . .

Very beautifully worded, ‘If You Saw Me in Heaven’ poses many questions that might be in the minds of every individual with regard to their time in Heaven. Would Heaven be as calm a place like the way the term is often used; would it be a place where old strife’s be forgotten and one can start anew? Though these questions remain unanswerable at present; the boldness of penning down what reflects the thoughts of many is indeed commendable.

If You saw me in heaven

Amidst nameless souls in a crowd

Would you shy away or look at me

Would you look diffident or proud?

Lost . . . .

‘Outwardly I was everything a well brought up girl should be , Inside I was screaming’ – these lines from the Titanic struck me when I read out the poem ‘Lost’ . Everyday we camouflage our deepest sorrows , our darkest fears and our anxieties with the help of a smile. But behind this mask lies a broken and hurt soul- broken but brave still to hold  on to the miseries of the world without a flicker on the face.

You may never know

But she is lost

In an invisible maze of life

With impenetrable walls around her-

You cannot see but she is trapped-

She knows not how to break through them

And cries invisible tears

Disguised as smiles on her face.

Vaijayantee Bhattacharya with Mosaic Vision
Photo: Abhizit Dutta

Robert Frost had said, ” Poetry is when an emotion has found its thought and the thought has found words.” This holds  true when you read the poems  by Vaijayantee. Each poem stems from a very basic thought. The simplicity used to express  some of the most complex thoughts and situations is bound to leave you mesmerised. If you are a lover of literature, a person with poetic instincts, or an artistic soul ; then Mosaic Vision is bound to leave a profound impact on you.

Mosaic Vision is available on Amazon in paperback and Kindle edition. It would soon be available in all leading bookstores near you.

 

The Red Sofa: Michele Lesbre

“ Even today, I sometimes think of the brief apparition of that stranger I caught in a private moment and of others who have mysteriously settled into my memory, like silent witnesses of my wanderings. “ – The Red Sofa

I believe, that you tend to learn a little more about yourself every time, you embark on a journey. This has been well reflected in the  novel, The Red Sofa by Michele Lesbre.  I read the English version of the novel translated by Nicole and David Ball. This book is available at any Seagull bookstore near you.

This is the journey of Anne, which has been described with sheer elegance and interspersed with episodic flashbacks; which reveals to the reader her personality, glimpses of her past lover and the bond which she shared with her friend Clemence.

Often in our overtly hectic schedules, we tend to neglect the little memories of our life which make it all the more precious. The story line follows the finer observations made by Anne and the deeper contemplation about life which she realizes throughout her quest to find her long-lost lover. From making a journey by train to an unknown land, to becoming habituated by the presence of her grim compartment partner; all these finer details reflect the beauty of the journey that she undertook.

A recurring theme which is common between Anne and her friend Clemence was the acceptance of lost love. Love is not only an emotion but also a moment to cherish for as long as one has it. It is difficult to find love and sustain it through the various ups and down; similarly it is equally difficult for people to cope- up with lost love at times. However, both the ladies have been portrayed as strong women, willing to live their lives with dignity and confidence. Though saddened momentarily on the mention of their unaccomplished relationships, the two women bonded over books and stories; over history, heroes and coffee. It is a symbol of strength possessed by women which is often overshadowed by the feeling of pity for their lost love by the onlookers.

Within the 110 pages of the book, The Red Sofa subtly teaches us some of the harshest truths of our lives and yet gives us hope to continue with it ; for life is short and must be lived with contentment rather than spending time grieving over the loss.

5 Reasons to Read The Serpent’s Revenge

The Last time I ventured to  the Starmarks in Quest Mall, I came across The Serpent’s Revenge by Sudha Murthy. I have recently started reading her books, and am in awe of her writing . Thus, this was a book that I had to pick up. It took me only two days to complete it . And Yes! I loved it. I loved it for more than one reason. Hence, here are 5 reasons why I liked the book and I am sure you would too, upon reading it.

  1. Its MAHABHARAT Time! 

If you are a Mahabharata freak like me, then this is the book to add to your collections. with over two dozens of stories, especially curated from the Great Epic, The Serpent’s Revenge brings to you an unseen and hidden version of this tale.

        2. The Tales are short and crisp.

Each story is hardly five pages long. The stories cover a wide range of themes like love, betrayal, sacrifice, courage, gratitude, intelligence and others. Beautifully put down, each story summarizes an important part of the biggest epic of India. Not only do the stories catch your attention , but it also leaves you with a food for thought.

      3. It Deals with the AFTERMATH of the War too. 

For most novels written on the Mahabharata, you do not find references on the aftermath, barring a few. But , The Serpent’s Revenge pays equal attention to both before and after the war. In fact, it is on a closer look at the names of the chapter, that you would find the book named after a chapter which takes place generations after the war.

      4. Beautiful Illustrations to Watch out for. 

No matter how much you say that a book helps in creating an image of the situation in your mind’s eye; a little illustrations can actually do a lot of good. Hence, Murthy’s illustrator Priyankar Gupta takes care of this aspect. Some incredibly detailed illustrations follow every tale in this book. Not only does it depict the situation but also hints on symbolism. At times, the illustration alone tells you about the scene and the tale. Indeed the saying- ‘A Picture is worth a thousand words ‘ is true!

#serpentsrevenge #bookreview #illustrations #blogpost coming up soon.

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      5. Your perfect On-The-Go Book Buddy

Comprising of short stories nestled between a hundred and eighty-two pages, The Serpent’s Revenge has surely been designed for those lazy days when you grab a book and a cup of coffee; or for those long unending journeys where it serves as your best companion.

The Serpent’s Revenge is available in all the leading bookstores near you. It can also be purchased online through Flipkart, Snapdeal and Amazon. If you have read this book , do let me know if you have liked it and why? If you have not , well then you know where to find it , if you want to read it sometime later on.

 

Amba: The Question of Red – Laksmi Pamuntjak

Amba : The Question of Red written by Laksmi Pamuntjak revolves around the modern-day retelling of the stories of the early Mahabharata. This Indonesian novel set against the backdrop of the political turbulence of the 1960’s explores the love and romance shared between the protagonists. Even though a modern-day retelling, Pamuntjak has tried to keep the story line as realistic and close to the original story line, as possible.

Salwa, who was chosen by Amba’s parents for her as the best suitor depicted an epitome of gentleness, calmness, satisfaction and care; and yet lacked to touch the chords of Amba’s heart. Amba , on the other hand , often considered herself to be lesser than her ever beautiful sisters- Ambika and Ambalika. She often thought to herself that she was not fit for being loved and should follow her parent’s instructions and be the good girl that they wanted her to be. Bhishma, a highly educated doctor who gives up his family inheritance and lavishness to serve the people enters the life of Amba , only to turn it upside down forever.

If you are to draw parallel with the original Mahabharata, then true to his character Salwa plays a restricted part in the story. Amba, whose life’s major intention was revenge is shown as a more toned down woman with the sole aim of finding his lost lover throughout the novel. Bhishma on the other hand resembles his character to quite an extent. Despite being handsome and talented, he was forced to live the life of a celibate almost all his life. Though he did love Amba, he was also destined to not have her forever. It is said that the original Princess Amba had cursed Bhisma that each of the sins that he would commit in his lifetime would turn to sharp arrows that would pierce his body when he would die. It is interesting to note how Bhisma would meet his end in Amba: the Question of Red.

Further, for those of you who are well versed with the Mahabharata would wonder about the existence of Shikhandi/Shikhandini the re-incarnation of Amba as Drupad’s daughter/son ; who was destined to exact revenge from Bhisma. The presence of Shikhandi is a question that arouses curiosity in the minds of the readers till the very last page and I would leave it at that for you to find out.

What is interesting in the novel is the theme of lost love. Every character – Salwa, Amba and Bhisma had loved in their lifetime and lost the person whom they loved dearly. Whether it be a conscious decision to leave a person due to incompatibility ; or a game of fate which makes two lovers separate; the recurring theme of lost love is a highlight in the entire novel. Another interesting theme is in the name of the novel itself- The Question of Red. Red is a symbol of love, danger, fate and happiness. When you progress deep into the novel, you would realise how Red is the colour of Fate- the fate which decided the destiny of two young lovers- Amba and Bhishma.

Amba : The Question of Red is a must read for those who love to read romance or would like to explore another take on this ancient epic; where amidst many other themes love is also a crucial one. Pamuntjak has beautifully sealed the fate of the two lovers across decades in this novel. I would certainly recommend my friends to read it. It is available in all leading bookstores near you or can be purchased through Amazon, Flipkart and Snapdeal.






The Mother I Never Knew: Sudha Murthy

What started off with an unlikely event of finding Venkatesh’s lookalike; lead to the revelation of a life time for two brothers distanced from each other by birth and fate under a harsh society. “My mother says that everyone in this world has six lookalikes. I believe that mine are in other countries, because I haven’t met anybody here who looks like me. Maybe your lookalike is right here in this district.- Page 37” .Similarly, after losing his father, Mukesh stumbles upon a photograph which opened a whole new world for him; and he embarks on a quest to find his true identity. The Mother I Never Knew by Sudha Murthy encompasses two novellas spread across different states, class, caste, situations and yet bound together by an invisible thread of social taboos, social evils and social consciousness inflicted upon the characters.

Murthy beautifully captures the essence of motherhood – the love of a mother for her son amidst the limitations of the social conflicts. Motherhood is an experience that needs to be felt and understood. The chord between a mother and a son is a very special one which cannot be seen and understood by anyone save them. Often, a mother might be misunderstood for her actions, but the steps taken are always for the betterment of the child. The Mother I Never Knew  portrays an important lesson- to never judge the actions of the mother. Onlookers never really know the situation that the mother had to go through and hence take harsh steps.

A frequently asked question under the circumstances outlined in the book is that of loyalty. Does it lie with the mother who gives birth; or the mother who raises the child; often drawing parallels towards the eternal relationship savoured between Devki, Krishna and Yashoda in the Mahabharat. There is no fixed answer to this question as both mothers are part of the same scale to balance the life of the child. Neither is greater than the other. Nevertheless, the scale maybe slightly bent towards the mother who raises the child. Murthy too hints towards this in the following lines, “Giving birth is simply a biological event but parents must move mountains to raise a child to be a good human being. I salute the mother who made you what you are. – Page 202”

Thus, The Mother I Never Knew is an extremely emotional novella which portrays how the search of two men for their identity uncovers the truth from the clutches of the stereotypical patriarchal society. I would highly recommend this book to everyone. It is available in your nearest bookstores or can be ordered online through Flipkart, Amazon and Snapdeal.

The Teak Almirah : Jael Silliman

Empty and waiting The Teak Almirah stood witness to lonliness, longing, and pain. Secrets, fears and hopes for the future were stuffed inside its locked doors. We all make space for those we love and too often keep our dreams locked away until we find whatever it is we have been seeking.“

What does Calcutta / Kolkata mean to you- friends, family, community, lifestyle, nostalgia, happiness and many more. Kolkata is not a place regarding which feelings can be described. It is an emotion in itself which needs to be experienced. The Teak Almirah beautifully paints a picture of the various feelings regarding this place through the eyes of four Jews.

The Jews of Calcutta had come down from Baghdad. They were a prosperous community having built mane estates, bakeries, restaurants and synagogues throughout their stay in the city. In fact, Nahoums still remains as one of the best bakeries in the city. The story line narrates the life and personalities of four modern day Jews who have a strong bond with the city, their lost community and nostalgia of a time when the community flourished in Calcutta.

While most Jews decided to migrate to different countries especially to Australia, Seema decided to stay back in the city. She had emptied her Teak Almirah for the special person in her life. “He’s the only man I’ve ever loved.” Seema said, “Shall I betray him now? “. Seema , through her years of happiness and sorrows had seen the city change drastically. Tamara, on the other hand is a dancer from London. Her father was one of the very few who migrated to the United Kingdom. Having lost him at a very young age, she had always wanted to discover her father’s hometown- Calcutta. Her joy knew no bounds when she finally got the opportunity. But in time she would also discover that her identity might not be very welcome in the conservative Indian society, and thus decide to hide it. Mordy returns to Calcutta from Australia after a good sixty years to pay respects to his late parents. Unfortunately, he is greeted by shock when he sees a place and a society changed from its core. He feels like a stranger and loner in the city that he grew up in and loved much once. In fact, he starts despising the new Calcutta till he meets friends from his own community who gives him a new perspective to the city and the changes that it has harbored. Firozah, who lives in Bombay faces a new storm in her life when she discovers her long hidden past with the Jewish community of Calcutta.

The Teak Almirah  is an amalgamation of nostalgia and changing times; it is a reflection of cherishing your individual identity and yet moving ahead with the progressing time. It depicts the beauty of a vanishing community and the struggles to keep it alive so that it is not wiped out completely from the memories of the people. The once flourishing Jewish community is today etched in the memories of the old. The author, Jael Silliman being one of the last members of the community in the city, is trying to archive the community memories in her website www.jewishcalcutta.in .

The Teak Almirah is available in major bookstores and can also be purchased online via Amazon.